Jesus and the Little Children

And they were bringing unto him little children, that he should touch them: and the disciples rebuked them.
But when Jesus saw it, he was moved with indignation, and said unto them, “Suffer the little children to come unto me; forbid them not: for to such belongeth the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall in no wise enter therein.”
And he took them in his arms, and blessed them, laying his hands upon them (Mark 10:13-16).

One of the aspects of Jesus that is most commonly known involves His concern for children. For generations people have drawn or painted various representations of Jesus with little children. For us today it only seems natural that Jesus would show such concern for little children.

Yet, as the response of the disciples indicates, His concern was not considered natural automatically in the first century. It is easy for us today to look back on the disciples and think them to be hard-hearted or perhaps even inconsiderate or uncaring for children. But that is unfair. It is not as if the disciples do not like little children– the disciples want to make sure that the Lord is not inconvenienced or bothered so that, at least in their estimation, He can continue to focus on the adults who really need Him, His power, and His message. The children, after all, will probably not remember Jesus too well, and certainly not as well as the adults would and should. Jesus and the disciples were at work in “grownup” matters, and therefore why should the Lord be hindered by a bunch of little children?

Jesus responds to them sharply. Yes, He has great concern for the “lost sheep” of Israel (cf. Matthew 10:6), and focuses much of His energy on pointing them toward God’s Kingdom. Nevertheless, the little children are very important!

Our society has become very child-focused and child-oriented in the past century; it is easy for us to work diligently to make sure that we do not overlook children. Jesus’ care for the children should surely demonstrate to us that care for children is extremely important in the sight of God. Jesus’ care for the children underscores a more fundamental point: God cares for all the “little people” of the world, both in terms of age and social standing. Whereas many may overlook small children, the dispossessed, the widow, and the like, God cares for all of them and desires for us to care for them also (cf. James 1:27). Everyone is important to God!

Jesus’ concern is not just for the little children; He also takes advantage of the opportunity to teach the adults a very important lesson. Jesus was well aware that the disciples had been disputing among themselves who would be the greatest in the Kingdom (cf. Mark 9:33-37), and even in that instance pointed out how God receives children and those who receive children. In Mark 10, a more fundamental point is made: those who enter God’s Kingdom enter it like a child. The Kingdom belongs to children!

One can only imagine the response of the disciples. They had good reason to be ashamed– the very ones whom they were willing to overlook were the ones most precious before God. They were trying to forbid those to whom the Kingdom belonged so that Jesus could more freely proclaim that Kingdom among others!

Jesus’ point is quite humbling, and such is the intent. The illustration puts to lie the belief that children are born inherently sinful– how can the Kingdom of God belong to unregenerate brats? If the way we enter the Kingdom is by becoming as children, and if children are inherently sinful, did Jesus bear the cross in vain? By no means; children are pure and innocent before their Maker, and only as they grow up do they learn to sin (cf. Romans 5:5-18).

So what is it about little children that makes them ideal citizens of God’s Kingdom? It is their unfailing trust in their parents. They look up to their parents and think the world of their parents, no matter how worthy or unworthy that belief may be. They naturally depend on their parents to take care of their needs in life and trust that their parents have their best interest at heart and seek the best for them.

And so it ought to be with believers and their heavenly Father. Those who are part of God’s Kingdom have unfailing trust in God the Father (cf. Hebrews 11:6). They look up to and think the world of their heavenly Father, and He is worthy of that honor (cf. Psalm 150). They learn to depend on their heavenly Father to take care of their needs in life and know that He has their best interest at heart, seeking what is good for them, since He was willing to give up His Son for their salvation (cf. Matthew 6:21-34, Romans 8:31-39).

It is easy for little children to have that trust in their earthly parents and their heavenly Father; they do not really know any better. Such trust is a profound challenge for “grownups,” however, because they have lost that innocence and are always tempted to trust in themselves and what they can perceive. It is always easier to walk by sight than by faith, but citizens of the Kingdom are willing to trust in God no matter how terrible things may seem (cf. 2 Corinthians 5:7)!

Jesus loves the little children. Let us praise God that He is concerned for the lowly and easily overlooked, and let us develop that childlike trust in Him!

Ethan R. Longhenry

Our Need For Others

Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their labor. For if they fall, the one will lift up his fellow; but woe to him that is alone when he falleth, and hath not another to lift him up. Again, if two lie together, then they have warmth; but how can one be warm alone? And if a man prevail against him that is alone, two shall withstand him; and a threefold cord is not quickly broken (Ecclesiastes 4:9-12).

God created mankind to be a social creature. As an individual alone in a hostile world, one person does not seem to stand much of a chance. In larger numbers, however, mankind can dominate the environment and provide all kinds of services for one another. For better or worse, human beings need their fellow human beings.

It is tragic in many ways that our current society tends to exalt self-sufficiency, as if anyone has ever succeeded truly on his or her own. Humans were never designed to be “self-sufficient.” There has not been one person who truly “made it” by merely “pulling up his own bootstraps.” Somehow, somewhere, there have always been people providing assistance, be it instruction, financial or material support, or some other such thing. Nevertheless, how many people withdraw themselves into their own worlds and attempt to handle all of life’s circumstances on their own? How often are such people depressed, discouraged, in despair, and miserable?

Our Creator knows quite well that we are unable to function on our own, no matter how strongly we may seek to protest. One of the first lessons in wisdom is that we are not sufficient in and of ourselves. Our ways lead to death (Proverbs 14:12). It is not within us to guide our own steps (Jeremiah 10:23). We must lean on the Lord: that requires some humility and the swallowing of pride, but without doing so, we cannot be saved (1 Peter 5:6-7)!

Because we cannot function on our own, God, in His infinite wisdom, established the church, and composed it as a body– Christ is its Head (Ephesians 5:23), and individual believers make up the various components of the body, working together, supporting one another in times of joy or despair (1 Corinthians 12:12-27). As man cannot make it alone physically, he cannot think to make it alone spiritually. Just as mankind comes together in communities, so God has established His community for His people.

Local churches may have their ups and downs, and they may not function entirely as their Lord intended. That is why it is so incumbent on every believer to recognize the lie and deception of society– that somehow they can do it all on their own, physically, emotionally, and spiritually– and be willing to be accountable to his or her fellow believers and seek to encourage and be encouraged by them at every opportunity (James 5:16, Hebrews 10:24-25).

The stronger the connection among fellow believers, the harder it is for the Adversary to succeed. Let us recognize our need for fellow believers, and seek to encourage and be encouraged constantly!

Ethan R. Longhenry