Jesus’ Genealogical Surprises

The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham begat Isaac; and Isaac begat Jacob; and Jacob begat Judah and his brethren; and Judah begat Perez and Zerah of Tamar; and Perez begat Hezron; and Hezron begat Ram; and Ram begat Amminadab; and Amminadab begat Nahshon; and Nahshon begat Salmon; and Salmon begat Boaz of Rahab; and Boaz begat Obed of Ruth; and Obed begat Jesse; and Jesse begat David the king. And David begat Solomon of her that had been the wife of Uriah (Matthew 1:1-6).

When we come to the beginning of Matthew’s Gospel, it is easy to fall into the temptation of “skipping over” the first few verses that describe the genealogy of Jesus Christ.  After all, the Old Testament is full of such lists, and they are perceived as being quite “boring.”  What is one doing in the New Testament– beginning the New Testament, no less?

Yes, the genealogy does set forth how Jesus is the descendant of David and Abraham, which is significant for His claim of being the Messiah.  But there are also many surprises in Jesus’ genealogy.

First we come to Tamar (Matthew 1:3).  Her story is described in Genesis 38: she is married to Judah’s oldest son Er, who dies, and then is married to Onan, who dies, and is held in waiting for Judah’s youngest son Shelah.  When Judah does not marry her to Shelah, she takes on the garb of a cult prostitute and Judah hires her service.  When the whole situation is revealed, he confesses that she is more righteous than he (Genesis 38:26)!  And not only is she an ancestor of Jesus, she is explicitly named in the genealogy!

Next is Rahab (Matthew 1:5).  Her story is in Joshua 2.  She is the prostitute who maintains an inn in Jericho, and she hides the Israelite spies.  She recognizes that the God of Israel is the true God and does not want to share in the fate of her fellow countrymen.  Thus, we have a prostitute who deceives civic authorities who is an ancestor of Jesus the Christ, and she also is listed explicitly in His genealogy!

We also have Ruth (Matthew 1:5), and her wonderful story of faith in the book bearing her name.  She is a Moabitess who clings to the God of her mother-in-law Naomi despite all the adversity they were experiencing.  Yet another foreigner who is an ancestor of Jesus of Nazareth!

It is also interesting to note that Bathsheba is alluded to but not explicitly named in Matthew 1:6.  She is remembered as being the wife of Uriah the Hittite!

What are we to gain from this?  A woman willing to sell herself to her father-in-law to bring forth descendants, a lying Canaanite prostitute, and a Moabitess widow are explicitly named as ancestors of the Messiah, the Son of God.  Despite their flaws, and despite their methodology, they are women of faith.  Tamar ends up being “more righteous” and perpetuates the line of Judah.  Rahab acts as she does by faith.  All Ruth has is faith.

And Bathsheba?  She acted according to the dictates of King David, engaging in acts of faithlessness.  And she is left unnamed.

People of faith are not always pretty, and some of their actions may be hard to understand.  And yet Tamar, Rahab, and Ruth have the ultimate testimony: they can claim Jesus Himself as their descendant.

Let us consider the “surprises” in Jesus’ genealogy, and recognize that even when faith is found in the strangest of places, it honors and glorifies God.  Let us be found as people of faith!

Ethan R. Longhenry

Jesus’ Genealogical Surprises

The Greatness of Jesus’ Accomplishments

For while we were yet weak, in due season Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: for peradventure for the good man some one would even dare to die. But God commendeth his own love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us (Romans 5:6-8).

Part of the greatness of what Jesus has accomplished involves the profound contrasts between who He is and what we are. He humbled Himself mightily by becoming a man, let alone a carpenter’s son in the backwoods of Galilee (Philippians 2:5-11). While we humans prize strength, power, glory, learning, and might, Jesus came in weakness, humility, and relative insignificance (Isaiah 53, 2 Corinthians 12:9, Matthew 11:28-29). When humans would expect the Son of God to conquer with the sword, Jesus conquered through dying and being raised again (1 Corinthians 15:57-58).

And even though we are sinners, and deserve nothing but death and condemnation for what we have done, Jesus died for us.

He by whom all things were created died so that we could live (John 1:1-3).

The Author of Life laid His down so that we could live in Him (Acts 3:15, John 10:17, 2 Corinthians 13:4).

He who has all strength took on weakness to deliver us from our own weaknesses (2 Corinthians 13:4).

He who loves beyond measure experienced mockery and derision so that we could be reconciled to God (Matthew 27, Romans 5:11).

The High Priest became the sacrifice so that we could minister to God (Hebrews 7).

And this was all accomplished not because we were holy, not because we were righteous, and not because we deserved it.

It was accomplished despite our sinfulness, despite our unrighteousness, and despite our own lack of love and mercy.

It was finished so that we could learn to love through Jesus Christ. Jesus suffered, and we are to suffer (Romans 8:17). The Word became flesh so that flesh could obey the Word (John 1:14).

Jesus died for sinful man so that man could be restored to His image (Romans 8:29).

When we ponder on these things, it is hard not to be humbled, astonished, and greatly thankful for all that was accomplished despite ourselves.

And it should provide sufficient motivation to go and reflect that love to all men (Matthew 5:13-16)!

Ethan R. Longhenry

The Greatness of Jesus’ Accomplishments

Divine Kindness

“But love your enemies, and do them good, and lend, never despairing; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be sons of the Most High: for he is kind toward the unthankful and evil” (Luke 6:35).

Love and kindness come easily for those who are loving and kind to us.  We enjoy time we spend with those who love us and who are kind to us.  We get together with them and eat and give presents and receive presents.  We recognize that such people in our lives help make life worth living.

Can you imagine attempting to share such gifts with those who hate you?  What happened if you gave gifts to ungrateful people?  What if you did good to others and were repaid with evil?  What happens if you lend someone money and they never repay?

According to human logic, we would at best have nothing to do with such persons, and at worst do them harm (cf. Matthew 5:43).  It is expected that lovable people are loved and unlovable people are shunned.  It is expected that those who are ungrateful get little and those who do not repay have no credit.

Yet, in the Kingdom of God, all of these things are turned on their head.  Jesus turns the world upside down!  He prayed for those who reviled Him and crucified Him (Luke 23:34).  He prayed for His disciple whom He knew would deny Him (Luke 22:31-32).

As it is written,

For while we were yet weak, in due season Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: for peradventure for the good man some one would even dare to die. But God commendeth his own love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, shall we be saved from the wrath of God through him. For if, while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, shall we be saved by his life; and not only so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation (Romans 5:6-11).

While it is always easier to point fingers at everyone else, we must recognize that we, too, have spent our time in unkindness and ungratefulness (Titus 3:3-8).  God has showed kindness to us when we were unthankful and evil.  He showed us mercy despite our unmerciful attitudes.  He was not yet willing to condemn us even though we were willing to condemn others.  He provided wonderful gifts even though we forsook Him.

Therefore, it ought to be but a little thing for us to show divine kindness: love and help not just those who love us and help us, but also to those who make us uncomfortable, those who might use and abuse us, and those who may hate us.  After all, without God showing us such divine kindness, where would be be?

Ethan R. Longhenry

Divine Kindness

Samson and Revenge

And Samson called unto the LORD, and said, “O Lord GOD, remember me, I pray thee, and strengthen me, I pray thee, only this once, O God, that I may be at once avenged of the Philistines for my two eyes” (Judges 16:28).

The Judges author presents the story of Samson as a cycle of vengeance.  The father of the Timnite shames Samson, and in revenge, he has the grain of Philistia burned.  In revenge, they kill the Timnite and her father, and seek to do to Samson what Samson did to them.  Samson then kills more Philistines (Judges 15).  The Philistines, through Delilah, figure out how to capture Samson, and blind him in vengeance for what he did to them.  And here, at the end of his life, Samson asks God to give him strength to get revenge on Philistia for his eye.

What is the result? The death of thousands, but no real change.  Philistia is still in control, and Israel is still humbled before them.  Samson’s vengeance is not enough to save Israel.

Samson’s life provides a vivid demonstration of the fruitlessness of the cycle of vengeance.  Its desire is never satisfied; there is always some new affront that requires restitution.  This is not God’s way in His Kingdom.

Avenge not yourselves, beloved, but give place unto the wrath of God: for it is written,
“‘Vengeance belongeth unto me; I will recompense,’ saith the Lord.”
“But if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him to drink: for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire upon his head. Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good (Romans 12:19-21).

Only by loving our enemies can we win them over or to at least demonstrate that we are God’s children (Matthew 5:43-45, Luke 6:27-36).  Let us leave judgment in God’s hands, and love all men!

Ethan R. Longhenry

Samson and Revenge